The DC Cabaret Network holds a monthly open mic at The Black Squirrel in Adams Morgan, generally the first or second Monday of the month (check the home page or our newsletter for details). Singing starts at 8 p.m., social hour is at 7. Come early, have a drink and something to eat, and network with fellow DCCN members and cabaret enthusiasts.


Members and non-members are welcome! Typically the first set will be hosted/structured, then we take a short break, and the second set is more of a free-for-all. It's an informal and very welcoming environment, and lots of fun.


Address for The Black Squirrel:
2427 18th Street NW
Washington, D.C. 20009
(202) 232-1011


We provide a pianist and a sound technician, you provide sheet music and your voice! We ask for a $15 donation from singers, $10 for audience members.



Helpful Hints for a Successful Open Mic Performance

 

1. Please have music for the piano player that is:
          -- Clearly readable from a distance of 24 inches

          -- Clean and flat with all the pages IN ORDER

          -- Ideally (but not necessarily) in a three-ring binder.

     

    2. Clearly mark your music for any changes of tempo or key.

     

    3. Have the music in the key you need. The accompanist is not expected to transpose on sight.

     

    4. It is probably not a good idea to bring a song that only Rachmaninov could play on a first viewing! Always have a backup song that’s easier to play if the first is too complicated.

     

    5. Before you begin, quietly sing a few bars in order to convey the tempo you want. Clapping or snapping your fingers can be off-putting.

     

    6. With the advent of electronic devices, please don’t place a small screen like a cell phone or iPad mini in front of a pianist and expect them to be able to read it; much less scroll and play at the same time. Personal devices are fine, as long as the screen is large enough for the notes to be legible.

     

    7. It is also a good idea to be somewhat familiar with the song. Reading from the sheet music or a lyrics sheet is perfectly acceptable, however not knowing the song can turn into an exercise in futility.

     

    8. Do not let the music director take control of the song – he or she is following YOU and supporting YOU, not the other way around.